IA Section D - Analysis (6 marks)
Markbands and student examples

A suggested number of words for this section is 500–650.

This section should consist of an analysis of the evidence listed in Section B. This section WILL be written in prose, NOT a bullet-pointed list.

This section should consist of the following:

  • A demonstration you understand the significance of the issue in its historical context.
    • What was going on in the world during the scope of your investigation that may have influenced events that you have investigated?
    • Set the stage for a critical analysis of your evidence.
  • A critical examination of the factual material presented in Section B.
    • All references to these sources MUST be cited.
    • A critical examination of one to several possible answers for your question.
    • A critical examination of other possible interpretations / answers for your question.
  • A demonstration of your awareness of the significance of the sources that you evaluated in Section C.
    • All references to these sources MUST be cited.
  • No new material may be presented in this section.

 
Suggested Format of Section D


Historical Context

 

Write a paragraph demonstrating your understanding of the issue in its historical context. What events were going on in the United States (or world) during the scope of your investigation that may have led to underlying assumptions or points of view on this issue that you will break down and analyze in this section?  

 

Significance of Sources from C

 

Write a paragraph or two that demonstrates your awareness of the significance of the sources you evaluated in Part C. Make critical comments on evidence from those sources that could help answer your research question.

 

Critical examination of one possible answer

 

Write a paragraph or two that examines evidence from part B that could lead to one possible answer to or interpretation of your research question. Here it is essential you make critical comments based on your evidence. Discuss cause-and-effect relationships, underlying assumptions and any interrelationships that are related to the evidence you presented.

 

Critical examination of a different interpretation(s) 

  

Write a paragraph or two that examines evidence from part B that could lead to a different possible answer or interpretation to your research question. Here it is essential you make critical comments based on your evidence. Discuss cause-and-effect relationships, underlying assumptions and any interrelationships that are related to the evidence you presented.

 

Laying  foundation for conclusion

 

Write a paragraph that considers the above interpretations and starts to transition toward what you think your conclusion will say. Start laying the foundation for your conclusion. (Again, no new material will be presented in the conclusion.)





Examples

To make it clear that you are placing your topic within its historical context, literally spell it out by writing, "This investigation is important in its historical context because ___________"

Examples of historical context:

Stalin established collectivization and the five-year plans because of the very real threat of foreign invasion during the 1920s and 30s.

An example from this investigation's question: To what extent did Stalin's Five-Year Plans improve Russia’s military?


This investigation is important in its historical context because Stalin's motivation to correct the problems with Russia's military came simply from the fact that he feared other countries, due to Russia’s previous failures from World War I. Russia had lost many soldiers due to Russia’s unequipped military, such as the 200,000 casualties in the Battle of Masuria. As Stalin wrote about industrializing for military purposes in the Pravda, “We must make good this distance in ten years. Either we do it, or we shall be crushed.


Examiner Comment: A clear attempt at establishing historical context.

The American Progressive reform movement to establish laws to eliminate child labor gained momentum in the early 1900s as a result of the rapid, un-checked growth of industry from 1870 and 1900.

U.S. business interest in the Hawaiian Islands was fueled in part because of its natural resources, but militarily, the young U.S. navy wanted control of the island before the British Empire took it to maintain trade between Australia and British Columbia.

Grading Criteria

 Markband

0       There is no analysis.

1–2    There is some attempt at analysing the evidence presented in section B.

3–4     There is analysis of the evidence presented in section B and references are included.  There may be some awareness of the significance to the investigation of the sources evaluated in section C. Where appropriate, different interpretations are considered.

5–6     There is critical analysis of the evidence presented in section B, accurate referencing, and an awareness of the significance to the investigation of the sources evaluated in section C. Where appropriate, different interpretations are analysed.


Examiner Notes: 
  • Very few candidates reached top marks here. The main problem seems to be making a difference between B and D. Many candidates repeated the information described in B without any analysis. References were scarce here also. Analysis is a skill that needs more training.

Section D Sturgis Student Examples

See a Complete IA that Earned a 24/25, including Section D, which earned a 6/6